Silkscreen of the Month: August

For the August print with Molly Crabapple, we went with a summery sand castle image. I have not spent nearly enough time at the beach this season as I would have liked, even though I found the absolute perfect place in NYC thanks to a friend.

For this design, I decided to just go all out with metallic and pearlescent inks. Digging through the glorious ink shelf at the Bushwick Print Lab, I found a couple containers of copper pigments to mix up.

When mixing, you add pigment to a transparent base and mix and mix and mix until it is evenly dispersed in the base. You can add this disperse water additive to help it blend in a lot better. I don’t know how it works, but it does! I used it when mixing the graphite ink back in the April silkscreen.

Lovely mixed ink.

 

When I started printing, I had meant this to be a 5 colour print. But it was brought up that the copper might be slightly transparent (it is, essentially, powder suspended in a fluid). So I put down a layer of red ink, then went on top with the copper ink. This is similar to when working in gold leaf, you can sometimes put down a size that is coloured yellow so that if there are any patches, cracks, etc then the under colour will help make this less noticeable. It really helped the copper pop!

 

Finished!

Copper, red, pearlescent blue, pearlescent white, gold and glossy magenta for the outlines. I was very much inspired by one of our Dr. Sketchy’s models, Delysia LaChatte when colouring up the image. So if you’re in NYC and want to check out a living Molly drawing, you should go check out one of her amazing performances. You can purchase the August Silkscreen of the Month at Etsy.com

2 Responses to “Silkscreen of the Month: August”

  1. […] might recall from last month’s print the red and copper metallic dry pigments I used to make my ink. Those pigments came from Guerra. […]

  2. […] August 6 colour silkscreen. A study in shoving metallic inks through a 305 screen. The under layer of the copper body was a bright red ink to help make the copper appear even more solid. The hair and border were pearlescent inks. The sand two different metallic golds. And the outlines a nice glossy maroon. […]

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